This work memorializes Reggie Andrews, aka Nu Nu. He was shot and killed outside his home on November 12, 2011—his birthday. The artist is Topaz. Located at 111th St and 5th Ave.
This is a promotional mural for a local hiphop group called Wolf Pack (though their MySpace page hasn't been updated since 2007). Artist is Bad Syne. Located at 111th St and Madison Ave.
Under the Metro-North Railroad tracks, on a stretch of sidewalk covered with pigeon crap, you'll find this pair of angel's wings. Artist's name is illegible. Located at 111th St and Park Ave.
James De La Vega, an East Harlem native of Puerto Rican descent, is perhaps the most prominent street artist in El Barrio. This is one of his Picasso-esque creations. Located at 111th St and Lexington Ave.
A closeup of De La Vega's piece.
Fly on the wall at 111th Street and 3rd Avenue. The artist is Jufe.
These stunning portraits can be found on East 115th Street and 1st Ave, beside a small memorial for the 5 Pointz mural space. Artists include Danielle Mastrion and Lexi Belle.
The 5 Pointz memorial at 115th St and 1st Ave.
This mural on 118th Street and 3rd Ave takes up half the block. Local artist KingBee is founder of the graffiti crew UWLAW (Urban Writers Logos and Walls).
This mural, titled "The Fight for Balance," is a stone's throw from the Triborough/RFK Bridge ramp at 124th St and 3rd Ave. See next photo for the list of artists.
The Fight For Balance at 124th St and 3rd Ave.
Dream Street Park was built in 1990, becoming a bright spot in what was (at the time) a gloomy neighborhood. Local children participated in making this mural, titled 'Calle de los Suenos.' Located at 124th St and 2nd Ave.
More from Dream Street Park at 124th St and 2nd Ave.
This stunning piece is a collaboration between two female artists: Claw, a New York-based graffiti writer turned fashion designer, and ELLE, an active graffiti artist based in Brooklyn. Located at 108th St and 3rd Ave.
The Dos Alas (two wings) mural portrays Ernesto "Che" Guevara, a leader of the Cuban Revolution, and Pedro Albizo Campos, head of the Puerto Rican independence movement against the US. The mural was originally painted by the groups Ricanstruction Netwerks and Puerto Rico Collective, and was restored in 2011 by Luisa's Liberation Artists Making Action (LLAMA). Located at 105th St and 3rd Ave.
A closer look at Dos Alas, at 105th St and 3rd Ave.
Several works seem to overlap at the corner of 103rd and 3rd: a political piece, an ad for an animal shelter (Advocates For Animals), and the picture of a man with his face wiped out. This last one, at least, is by De La Vega.
A closer look at De La Vega's piece at 103rd St and 3rd Ave.
On April 12, 2012, 23-year old Rudolph "Booga" Wyatt was in the process of robbing a drug store when he was fatally shot by a retired NYPD lieutenant. Now Wyatt is memorialized in a mural by TATS CRU, near the site of his death at 105th St and 1st Ave.
Axel Void's "Home" is a haunting piece on 102nd St overlooking a vacant lot on 2nd Avenue and inspired by a photograph by Martha Cooper. He created the mural in 2013 as part of the Los Muros Hablan (The Murals Speak) festival.
This De La Vega work commemorates the Cuban-American singer Celia Cruz. The "Queen of Salsa" died in 2003, the year this mural was painted. Located at 103rd St and Lexington Ave.
This De La Vega portrait memorializes a man named Tony Lopez and references Psalm 121, which starts as follows: "I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help/My help cometh from the Lord, which made heaven and earth." Located at 100th St and Lexington Ave.
This piece was painted in 2013 by Puerto Rican artist David Supelveda, aka Don Rimx. A resident of the building who was running for City Council once claimed that the incumbent councilwoman had commissioned the work as an act of intimidation bordering on voodoo. Located at 100th St between Lexington and 3rd Aves.
This work, which seems to reference the World Trade Center, was also commissioned as part of Los Muros Hablan. The artist is Lunar New Year (LNY), who was raised in Ecuador and currently lives in Newark, NJ. Located at 100th St and 3rd Ave.

Perhaps no NYC neighborhood has more murals per mile than East Harlem. Along with amazing taquerias and the ubiquitous sound of salsa music, these murals are an essential part of El Barrio's character.

The artists are mostly Puerto Rican (but also Ecuadorian or Jewish); there are some very famous names (De La Vega, Don Rimx) and some beloved local artists (Topaz, KingBee); some of the pieces are memorials commissioned by families who lost loved ones (Reggie Andrews, Rudolph "Booga" Wyatt), while others are political statements or conceptual works.

If you wander north of 96th Street and east of 5th Avenue, you can find dozens of these spray-paint masterpieces. Click through above to check out some of our favorites, and let us know any you love in the comments. You can also check out the walking guide to the murals below.

[Map by Joanna Purpich; Photographs by Jacob Daniels]